B. D. Wong Tames His Inner Hoarder

B. D. Wong Tames His Inner Hoarder

Trevor Tondro for The New York Times

Trevor Tondro for The New York Times

I loved this article on so many levels.

First and most superficially, they used the word "tame" to describe the actions taken to make a gorgeous space and which is personally and professionally relevant.

Second, and somewhat off topic, it features B. D. Wong, an actor whose work I love and who is Asian and I am Asian and there are just so few of us in the media so bear with me here.

Finally, oh, what a seriously enviable collection of the of industrial, antiques and art in this jewel box of a home. One could argue that from an organizing point of view there is a lot of "stuff," but I think Wong has done a wonder with his choices (he is, after all, a self confessed hoarder) and stores everything well. This is a home where people live, children!, and where food and life and fun all happen.

And it illustrates my continuous working point about how being organized doesn't have to be about getting rid of everything and making it look like no one lives there. Like this home, featured in The New York Times / Dwell special supplement. Every room is bright and white and styled but very little of the human inhabitant shines through.

Trevor Tondro for The New York Times

Trevor Tondro for The New York Times

If this was what everyone who hired me wanted, my job would be so easy. I wouldn't even have a job because most people can call Salvation Army and get rid of everything. While I love Dwell magazine, I ended my subscription because the homes they featured don't seem achievable. Aside from the design aspects being impressive, the homes they show are so stark and without true expression that the act of dwelling in a place can leave.

Do I mean that there should be a mess featured in these spaces? Because often, the phrase "lived in" can mean mess, like it does at my house. My kids never have just one wooden toy out at a time. Often, they have the tsunami effect in any room the are in for more than 3 minutes. No, I mean that B. D. Wong's place is a place where things happen, where things are done and made and cleaned up and put away. This home shows real life and it is achievable and realistic.

I could say more. But I will stop here because I am getting worked up and I'd rather spend time looking at the slideshow of B. D. Wong's apartment one more time.

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